Elon Musk offers residents of Tonga SpaceX’s Starlink internet access, but then withdraws his

Elon Musk said he would use SpaceX Starlink to bring the internet to the small island nation of Tonga, but then backed down on his offer shortly after making the statement.

Tonga was devastated on January 15 when a volcano erupted with the force equivalent to 500 atomic bombs, cutting off the region’s internet for at least the next month.

Musk tweeted on Friday: “People in Tonga let us know if it’s important for SpaceX to send to Starlink terminals?”

Whangarei-based MP Dr Shane Reti sent a letter to Musk shortly after hearing about the proposal asking if his space internet could help Tonga.

Everything was going according to plan until a few hours later Musk broke the news: “It’s a tough thing for us to do right now.”

Musk said SpaceX does not have enough internet satellites to help Tonga – the company has 2,000 devices in Earth orbit.

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Elon Musk said he would use SpaceX Starlink to bring the internet to the small island nation of Tonga, but then backed down on his offer shortly after making the statement.

The volcano has created a “massive explosion” that occurs once every thousand years.

It triggered a 7.4 magnitude earthquake, sending tsunami waves crashing across the island, leaving it covered in ash and cut off from outside help.

The explosion, which killed at least three people and sent tsunami waves across the Pacific, disrupted communications in the country of around 105,000 people.

In the United States, waves of more than four feet were recorded on the California coast on Saturday, and tsunami waves were recorded along the coast of Oregon, Washington, British Columbia in Canada and Alaska.

Whangarei-based MP Dr Shane Reti sent a letter to Musk shortly after hearing about the proposal asking if his space internet could help Tonga.

Whangarei-based MP Dr Shane Reti sent a letter to Musk shortly after hearing about the proposal asking if his space internet could help Tonga.

Everything was going according to plan until a few hours later Musk broke the news:

Everything was going according to plan until a few hours later Musk broke the news: “It’s a tough thing for us to do right now.” Musk said SpaceX doesn’t have enough internet satellites to help Tonga – the company has 2,000 devices in Earth orbit

Musk jumped at the chance to lend a hand by offering his Starlink satellite internet, which would require SpaceX to move the satellites over Tonga.

And that’s where the problem arose.

Shortly after offering to broadcast the internet, the billionaire tweeted, “We don’t have enough satellites with laser links and there are already geo satellites serving the Tonga region.”

Geosatellites include weather forecasting, radio and satellite television devices.

Musk jumped at the chance to lend a hand by offering his Starlink satellite internet, which would require SpaceX to move the satellites over Tonga

Musk jumped at the chance to lend a hand by offering his Starlink satellite internet, which would require SpaceX to move the satellites over Tonga

And with geosats over Tonga, Musk has no room to move his Starlinks there.

A Twitter user by the name of Christina chimed in on the conversation, saying, “Starlink needs a ground station for the satellites to have internet access.”

“But there is no possible ground station in Tonga because the submarine cable is out of service.”

Telephone links between Tonga and the rest of the world began to be reconnected on Wednesday evening, although full restoration of internet connectivity is likely to take a month or more, according to the owner of the archipelago’s only undersea communications cable. .

The volcano created a

The volcano has created a “massive explosion” that occurs once every thousand years. It triggered a 7.4 magnitude earthquake, sending tsunami waves crashing across the island, leaving it covered in ash and cut off from outside help.

Full network services will not be available until the undersea cable is repaired, telecom operator Digicel said. A specialist vessel is aiming to set sail from Port Moresby for a repair trip over the weekend, said Samiuela Fonua, chairman of cable owner Tonga Cable Ltd.

But with eight or nine days of sailing to retrieve material in Samoa and then an uncertain journey to the fault in the eruption area, he said it would be “lucky” if the job was done in a month.

“It could be longer than that,” he said by phone from Auckland, where he is coordinating repairs.

The giant explosion was also seen by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA recently shared a photo taken from the ship's cupola windows, showing a blanket of ash from plumes spewing thousands feet in the atmosphere.

The giant explosion was also seen by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA recently shared a photo taken from the ship’s cupola windows, showing a blanket of ash from plumes spewing thousands feet in the atmosphere.

The photos were taken by NASA astronaut Kayla Barron as the station passed over New Zealand, 1,200 miles from the site of the volcano, which is not visible in frame, while looking 253 miles above Earth.

The photos were taken by NASA astronaut Kayla Barron as the station passed over New Zealand, 1,200 miles from the site of the volcano, which is not visible in frame, while looking 253 miles above Earth.

“The cables are actually around the volcanic area. We don’t know… if they are intact, blown or stuck somewhere underwater. We don’t know if he is buried even deeper.

The giant explosion was also seen by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA recently shared a photo taken from the ship’s cupola windows, showing a blanket of ash from plumes spewing thousands feet in the atmosphere.

The photos were taken by NASA astronaut Kayla Barron as the station passed over New Zealand, 1,200 miles from the site of the volcano, which is not visible in frame, while looking 253 miles above Earth.

Astronaut Barron “opened the window” of the cupola on Sunday and saw the effects of the eruption, taking out his camera to capture the effects.

“Ash from Saturday’s underwater volcanic eruption in the remote Pacific nation of Tonga penetrated thousands of feet into the atmosphere and was visible from @Space_Station,” Barron shared in a tweet on his personal Twitter account.

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