Watch SpaceX launch 53 Starlink satellites and land a rocket at sea on Friday

SpaceX will launch 53 more of its Starlink internet satellites and land a rocket at sea today (August 19), and you can watch it all live.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying 53 Stellar Link The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida today at 3:21 p.m. EDT (1921 GMT). Watch it here on Space.com, courtesy of SpaceX, or directly through the company (opens in a new tab). Coverage will begin approximately 5 minutes before takeoff.

The action will include a landing as well as a take-off: approximately nine minutes after the start of the mission, the Falcon 9The first stage will return to Earth for a vertical landing on the SpaceX A Shortfall of Gravitas drone, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida.

Related: SpaceX’s Starlink megaconstellation launches in photos

This will be the ninth launch and landing for this particular Falcon 9 first stage, according to a SpaceX mission description. (opens in a new tab).

The rocket’s upper stage will continue its upward journey, eventually deploying all 53 satellites into low Earth orbit just over 15 minutes after launch.

SpaceX has already launched over 3,000 spacecraft for its Starlink constellation, which broadcasts broadband service to customers around the world.

Many of these satellites have increased this year. SpaceX has carried out 36 orbital launches so far in 2022, including 22 dedicated to Starlink missions. This is a record launch rate; the company’s previous mark for most orbital missions in a year was 31, set in 2021.

Mike Wall is the author of “The low (opens in a new tab)(Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrated by Karl Tate), a book about the search for extraterrestrial life. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall (opens in a new tab). Follow us on twitter @Spacedotcom (opens in a new tab) Or on Facebook (opens in a new tab).

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